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What we know (and suspect) about the iPhone 6 and iOS 8


As it is almost becoming a tradition in the industry, this time of the year gets fuelled with speculation, rumours, concepts and ideas on what the next iteration of Apple’s SmartPhone and mobile operating system would be. Here is a consolidation of what we know so far:

The Screen

Little room for doubt here, the iPhone 6 will definitely have a larger screen and quite possibly come in two different screen sizes (4.7 and 5.5 inch). There are quite a few facts pointing in this direction, and beyond leaked designs and alleged pictures of iPhone 6 parts, the key hint is coming from down the supply chain, where screen manufacturers are already ramping up production of screens in these sizes in time for a potential September launch. The latest to be added to the rumour mill is the announcement by Japan Display that they would start production of  a Quad-HD 5.5inch display in the second quarter of the year. Japan Display has recently been mentioned as to be entering the list of Apple’s component suppliers, and would mean a huge jump from the current 640 x 1136 resolution to a staggering 1440 x 2560. Details on the resolution for the eventual 4.7 inch display are yet to be released, but could be easily higher than current Full HD standards if density is maintained.

Design

Some very realistic and others bordering science fiction, iPhone concepts are a gradual approximation to the real product to which we are already used to. There seems to be consensus on two aspects: A slimmer body and a much thinner bezel allowing to minimise the volume (and hence weight) increase of the device due to the jump in the screen. Most of the concepts are evolutions from the current 5/5s family design (see this beautiful – and realistic – video by Sam Beckett).

There have also been alleged leaks of schematics that describe with high precision how the device would look like which have been used to create yet another concept which would inaugurate a new look for the iPhone saga.

iOS 8 and Wearables

It is becoming increasingly clear that iOS 8 would evolve the new look and feel inaugurated with iOS7, and would have a strong focus on Health and Fitness, in line with the blooming of wearable devices in the last couple of years which are seeing fitness as a huge potential market for wearable technology. It looks like all Health functions will be grouped inside Healthbook, just similarly to what Passbook meant as a place for coupons and passes. The increased popularity of iBeacons could possibly mean some further development of this technology with real life applications in iOS 8.

iOS 8 rendering by Sam Beckett

iOS 8 rendering by Sam Beckett

And wearables. While Healthbook would put your iPhone 6 at the core of your fitness activity, allowing you to track all your progress, monitoring health parameters would require sensors that are best fitted to wearable devices. This would be a good symbiosis with the much spoken and yet to be seen iWatch, which could pack an array of sensors to monitor your blood pressure, heartbeat and possibly even sugar levels and other parameters. This would be the perfect complement to create a complete ecosystem around Health & Fitness and would mark the start of Apple in wearable technology where others already have a couple of iterations.

As in previous years, still quite some time until we get to know iOS 8 as usual in WWDC 2014 -likely to be held mid June this year- and an eventual launch of the iPhone 6 in September, once iOS 8 goes through it’s beta phase, in what should be possibly one of the most feature and innovation packed launch in the iPhone’s history, teaming it with new devices, new design concept and a change in size. Looking forward!.

 

 

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BlackBerry to Become a Platform?


With the launch (and success) of BlackBerry Messenger (BBM) for iOS and Android platforms, BlackBerry opens up an important piece of their mobility ecosystem to non-Blackberry platforms.  It is not the first time the Canadian firm makes its software platform available outside the devices manufactured by themselves.

BlackBerry users would remember BlackBerry Connect, which allowed non-BlackBerry devices to offer BlackBerry email service to their users.

Times have changed enormously since BlackBerry Connect was released, and the company that then was quickly gaining market share concentrating on email, is now struggling for survival. Their devices have lost the battle agains the strong contenders from Apple and the Android ecosystem, but they still play a strong role in the Corporate world.

Would the launch of a multi platform BBM, a fundamental piece of their puzzle that’s underpinned an important portion of their success in former times, be actually the first step in their new strategy?. Would we see a release of the whole BlackBerry suite of productivity tools (Email, Calendar, Browser, Messenger) for iOS and Android?.

I believe this would be a brilliant strategy to follow. Focus on what is still a strength rather than on the devices where they seem to have lost their edge. They would enter with a potentially very strong proposition a market in which probably now only Good for Enterprise is playing, with the advantage of plugging it to their large base of BlackBerry Enterprise Servers already deployed across the globe.

Given the 20 million downloads of BBM in the first week after its launch looks like there definitely is an appetite for BlackBerry as a platform.

Corporate Crusade


First Crusade

Adhemar de Monteil carrying the Holy Lance in the First Crusade

It is becoming increasingly clear that Apple is executing a serious, calculated strategy to conquer the corporate space, traditionally dominated by Microsoft in the desktop/laptop space and BlackBerry in Mobile. It all started back in June when iOS 7 and OS X Mavericks were presented. Silently, they both introduced several features that clearly target the introduction of their devices in the corporate environment, where security policies and device manageability play a crucial role in determining which technology is used in the workplace.

In fact, the enterprise market is the only one where Macs are really increasing their footprint, reportedly at a yearly 20% uplift. Serious numbers for an industry -desktop computing- not living its best days.

Looks quite timely that OS X Mavericks includes several new features that make very good sense in a policy controlled environment, just to name a few:

Security enhancements to VPN connections used for remotely accessing resources in the corporate network, better ways of managing and controlling FileVault 2, the hard drive encryption facility in Mac OS X as well the possibility to use Apple TV for presentations onto screens and projectors.

Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/enterprises-will-love-mac-mavericks-2013-10#ixzz2iVxQHbff

Whilst OS X is not new in the corporate scene, iOS seemed to be lagging when compared to its desktop counterpart. This, together with BlackBerry’s lately decline, will surely boost the adoption rate of iPhone as the corporate mobility solution.

The list of features is extensive but can be summarised in the ability to embrace both personal and corporate use in a single device in a totally seamless way for the user. Details about them can be found in this article about the iOS 7 Event for Corporations that never happened.

Enterprise space

Enterprise space

And just when we thought these were strong arguments in the Corporate Crusade, the 22nd October event surprised us by giving out both the Operating System

and iWork (Apple’s equivalent to Microsoft Office) for free. How this translate to corporate purchase agreements is yet to be seen, but definitely a bold move within their calculated strategy to secure a leading position in the enterprise space.