Blog Archives

Corporate Crusade


First Crusade

Adhemar de Monteil carrying the Holy Lance in the First Crusade

It is becoming increasingly clear that Apple is executing a serious, calculated strategy to conquer the corporate space, traditionally dominated by Microsoft in the desktop/laptop space and BlackBerry in Mobile. It all started back in June when iOS 7 and OS X Mavericks were presented. Silently, they both introduced several features that clearly target the introduction of their devices in the corporate environment, where security policies and device manageability play a crucial role in determining which technology is used in the workplace.

In fact, the enterprise market is the only one where Macs are really increasing their footprint, reportedly at a yearly 20% uplift. Serious numbers for an industry -desktop computing- not living its best days.

Looks quite timely that OS X Mavericks includes several new features that make very good sense in a policy controlled environment, just to name a few:

Security enhancements to VPN connections used for remotely accessing resources in the corporate network, better ways of managing and controlling FileVault 2, the hard drive encryption facility in Mac OS X as well the possibility to use Apple TV for presentations onto screens and projectors.

Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/enterprises-will-love-mac-mavericks-2013-10#ixzz2iVxQHbff

Whilst OS X is not new in the corporate scene, iOS seemed to be lagging when compared to its desktop counterpart. This, together with BlackBerry’s lately decline, will surely boost the adoption rate of iPhone as the corporate mobility solution.

The list of features is extensive but can be summarised in the ability to embrace both personal and corporate use in a single device in a totally seamless way for the user. Details about them can be found in this article about the iOS 7 Event for Corporations that never happened.

Enterprise space

Enterprise space

And just when we thought these were strong arguments in the Corporate Crusade, the 22nd October event surprised us by giving out both the Operating System

and iWork (Apple’s equivalent to Microsoft Office) for free. How this translate to corporate purchase agreements is yet to be seen, but definitely a bold move within their calculated strategy to secure a leading position in the enterprise space.

Torpedo


Windows RT powered tablet

Windows RT powered tablet – Photo courtesy of Vernieman

Difficult times for Microsoft Surface. The tablet that is meant to bring Microsoft back in business and steal some market share from Android and iOS powered devices, could have a serious set back if the Redmond guys don’t come up with a clean solution fast.

One of the beauties of tablets is that they simplify the way we understand computing, making complex activities like an operating system upgrade seamless. Issues like this, with users reporting total data loss and devices being left unusable after attempting an upgrade to Windows RT 8.1, are a big torpedo right into the flotation line.

One can only hope for a quick solution to this problem.

More on this story:

Microsoft Pulls Windows RT 8.1 Update

Capturing the fleeting business


Nokia Lumia 820 onboard POS

Nokia Lumia 820 onboard POS

While still struggling in the consumer market, some potential success stories start to emerge for the Nokia and Windows Phone tech marriage. Turning a Nokia Lumia 820 into a mobile point of sale with specific apps connected to their booking and payment systems, allows to capture a very short-lived business opportunity like on board paid upgrades.

Onboard connectivity definitely plays a role in the success of the initiative, but more importantly, paves the way for the next level of loyalty recognition and rewarding on the spot thanks to the connection with the centralized CRM systems.

A promising prospect for Delta and Nokia/Microsoft and definitely a big scale experiment with 19.000 units distributed amongst Delta’s Cabin Crew.

More about this story:

Nokia Lumia 820 Flying High With Delta Airlines

Delta Streamlines In-flight Customer Service With New Windows Phone Handheld Devices For Flight Attendants

App Stores in the Enterprise?


App Stores

App Stores

The App Stores are one of the key pillars on which the SmartPhones have built their success. Not that mobile applications where only introduced at the time the stores became available, but they solved nearly all of the issues that existed until them.

First, it was very difficult for developers to find customers, and for customers to find the applications they wanted. This also discouraged many from investing time, effort and money in developing these native applications, which resulted in a low number of available ones.

Second, all the logistics of applications installed in devices rather than browsed from devices where not solved, in some cases falling into the traditional burdens of software distribution. Installing, uninstalling and specifically maintaining your applications up to date was not an easy thing to do.

Last, but not least, charging for the apps meant each developer had to find a solution for managing the payments, with PayPal having been a traditional partner on this space.

But suddendly these App Stores arrive, and buying applications becomes as easy as buying any other article online, making the installation and uninstallation of applications as easy as 1-2-3, and more importantly, you no longer need to worry about keeping your software up to date. The App Store will tell you and let you update what you want, when you want it. Easy right?. Bringing developers and consumers to a single place has also boosted both the availability and consumption of applications, with numbers of applications in the hundreds of thousands.

So are these new stores the panacea for software distribution?. I suspected so, and I kind of confirmed it when Apple launched the App Store for Mac. The concept is reaching the desktop. So this is when things get interesting. Can this be applied to your corporate environment?. I hope so.

Distributed computing

There are a number of issues typically associated to large estates of PCs usually running Windows.

First, one size does not fit all, so you will face different users with different software needs, meaning that you will need to find a balance between standardization (critical to keep support and maintenance costs under control) and the specific needs of your user communities.

Second, you will have to automate as much as possible the possible of provisioning applications upon users requests, and more importantly, keep an inventory of all of this, as you want to know who is using what to avoid any licensing issues.he

Cost. This is usually tackled by complex approval processes which in the end do not really cap the amount of money a user spends on software which is likely to be rarely used.

And not to talk about software updates and patching.

When you look at these traditional issues, it seems miraculous that the App Stores have achieved to resolve most of this issues for a wider, more diverse crowd than the one in any of the Company.

Applying the concept

So how about delivering vanilla desktops or laptops to your employees, and giving them a budget according to their profile?. If a concept such as an App Store could exist in the corporate environment, users could have a budget to spend there. Go to the supermarket, choose what you need and install it. You are running out of budget? Maybe you can return to the App Store that application you downloaded which no longer you are using.

This, if tied to an inventory of licenses, will surely help software costs under control on a very predictable manner, while giving a much better user experience. Your users are now autonomous and can self manage their software, which would also have a very positive impact in your helpdesk and engineering budgets.

Did I talk about software updates and patching? How much money do you spend on that?

I am sure there are lots of challenges to be solved before such a concept can be applied completely in the Enterprise world, but after seeing what Apple has achieved with the Mac App Store I am hopeful it will come…